Quick Action Plan for Gout

  1. The goal of diet for those with gout is to reduce the production of uric acid to normal levels. Cherries, and all rich colored berries, such as blueberries, are recommended. Consume half a pound of fresh or unsweetened frozen cherries per day for a period of three to six weeks as a healing protocol.
  • Organic cherry juice is especially good for gout, as are many of the new “magic juices” such as Goji, Acai and Noni juice, puree or powder. Pomegranate fruit extracts have been shown to be effective as well.
  • Eliminate alcohol consumption, which both increases uric acid production and reduces uric acid excretion in the kidneys. Gout sufferers should also maintain a low-purine diet, which completely omits organ meats, shellfish, yeast (brewer’s and baker’s), herring, sardines, mackerel, and anchovies.
  • Intake of dried legumes, spinach, asparagus, fish, poultry, and mushrooms, should also be curtailed. Refined carbohydrates and saturated fats are best kept to a minimum.
  • Drink plenty of pure water, because it keeps urine diluted and promotes the excretion of uric acid.
  • Test for food and environmental allergies and avoid all foods and substances to which you are allergic.
  • Cleansing and Detoxification, including colon and bowel cleansing therapies, fasting, kidney and gallbladder flushes, physical medicine, and homeopathic remedies.
  • In clinical trials with gout patients, devil’s claw was found to relieve joint pain, as well as reduce blood cholesterol and uric acid levels. For gout sufferers, professionals can recommend: 1-2 g of dried powdered devil’s claw root three times a day; 4-5 ml of (1:5) tincture three times a day; or 400 mg of dry solid extract (3:1) three times a day.
  • The following nutritional supplements are recommended: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 1.8 g daily), vitamin E (400-800 IU daily), folic acid (under a doctor’s supervision, 10-40 mg daily), and quercetin with bromelain (125-250 mg three times a day between meals).