Natural Remedies For Over 200 Illnesses

Bed-wetting

Overview

Bed-wetting refers to the involuntary wetting of the bed in the middle of night during childhood. It usually spontaneously stops by teenage years.

Pharmaceutical drugs such as anti-anxiety agents are commonly prescribed to treat bed-wetting. The problem is that these psychiatric drugs may actually aggravate the situation. Not only do they have side effects such as agitation, insomnia, anxiety and nausea, they are causing the body to be overloaded with chemicals that the body has to process.

Although the cause(s) of bed-wetting are unknown, chronic bed-wetting is often a general sign that there is some deeper underlying problem. Such problems can include hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), diabetes, and urinary tract infections. Other potential problems are emotional stress, small and weak bladders that cannot hold urine all night, excessive consumption of liquid beverages, sleeping too soundly, food allergies, heredity, and behavioral problems.

Bed-wetting can also be due to food allergies. When allergies are present, the child’s bladder can shrink, causing incontinence. Therefore food allergies must be screened for and treated if found.

There are natural cures for bed-wetting that do not involve the use of pharmaceutical drugs. The natural remedies which are used to treat bed-wetting involve restoring the biochemical balance of the body, and making lifestyle changes that will give individuals the mental and emotional tools to deal with life in general. There are also many alternative therapies that are designed to restore one’s mental and spiritual balance.

There are natural cures for bed-wetting that take into account your overall health, instead of merely trying treat the symptoms.

Prescription and non-prescription medication:

Your non-prescription and prescription are partially the reason that you have this illness or disease – you need to get off these medications, but do so only under the guidance of a licensed health care practitioner.

Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) has had remarkable results in dissolving stress.  Find a local practitioner here or go towww.thetappingsolution.com or www.tftrx.com

Ayurvedic Medicine

Ayurvedic remedies to treat bed-wetting are aimed at the nervous system and the urinary tract. We recommend you consult a licensed practitioner but the medicines that are commonly used are Vishatinduka vati, Shilajitwaadi vati, Chandraprabha vati, etc. You can also try the following remedies:

Fry one-teaspoonful coriander seeds in a pan until brown. Mix in one teaspoonful each of pomegranate flowers, sesame seeds and babul gum and grind the mixture into a very fine powder. Add crystal sugar to the powder and give one teaspoonful at bedtime.
Sarshapa in powder form, taken along with half a cup of milk before going to bed also gives positive results.

Traditional Chinese Medicine

We recommend you consult a licensed practitioner. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), views bed-wetting or enuresis as a disorder of water metabolism. In TCM, the three organs that control water metabolism are the Lungs, the Spleen and the Kidneys. Enuresis is usually explained in TCM as a deficiency of the energy of one or more of these organs. The Heart and the Liver may also play a part. Acupuncture has been found to be effective. The following herbs are used: fu ling, schisandra, Chinese yam, jinyingzi, ligusticum, teasel, black cardamon, suo yang, psoralea, blackberry, leekseed.

Aromatherapy

Cypress oil and rosemary oil are well known for their positive effects on the urinary system. They are both robust oils though so use with caution for children. Dilute a few drops of each in a good carrier oil and rub over the abdomen.

Homeopathic Medicine

We recommend you consult a licensed practitioner. Many homoeopathic medicines have been found to be beneficial. Kreosote (beechwood) is used in cases where bed-wetting occurs in the first part of the sleep and the child finds it difficult to wake up from deep slumber. Causticum is useful when involuntary urination is worse in winter and better in summer. It is also for children who tend to wet their pants when they cough or sneeze or even laugh. Equisetum (scouring rush) is for children who wet their pants or their bed for no known reason other than out of habit. It should be considered when the person has no other obvious symptoms. Berberis is also used.

Herbs

If bed-wetting occurs because of lack of nervous control of the bladder, an infusion of one part each of horsetail, St John’s Wort, cornsilk and lemon balm can be used. Take half a cup three times a day with the last does well before bedtime.

Other

Flower Remedies:

Gentian reassures both parents and child that any problems with bed-wetting are only temporary and will eventually be overcome. Walnut can also be used to ease the transition of change from nappies to potties.  Other remedies for children who are experiencing trouble with toilet training are crab apple which can deal with any feelings of shame or uncleanliness, and star of Bethlehem for the shock that an older child might experience, and pine for the guilt that may be felt. When toilet training becomes a problem and the child is unable to stay dry despite repeated attempts, then chestnut bud might help.

Naturopathic Medicine:

According to Joseph Pizzorno, ND, supplemental magnesium has helped children with this problem.

Reflexology:

The kidneys, diaphragm, ureters, adrenals and lower spine should be worked on.

Honey:

A teaspoon of honey before bed aids water retention and calms fears in children.

Cranberry Juice:

Giving your child cranberry juice before bedtime is a popular bedwetting remedy. The juice will help your child control his muscles and wet the bed less at night, or hopefully not at all. The typical amount that’s recommended is eight ounces, and you should encourage him to drink it before going to bed.

Andrea Butje | Aromahead andrea@aromahead.com – Aromatherapy

Carrie Vitt deliciouslyorganic@yahoo.com – Organic food recipes.

David Spector-NSR/USA david024@nsrusa.org – Meditation, stress

Judith Hoad judithhoad@gmail.com – Herbalist.

Kath May kathrynmay@talktalk.net – Reiki, Tai Chi.

Lillian Bridges lillian@lotusinstitute.com – Chinese medicine, living naturally.

Monika monika@healingmuse.com – Aromatherapy.

Rakesh  GAC@AyurvedicLifeStyles.com – Ayurvedic practitioner.

Joanne Callaghan – joanne@tftrx.comwww.RogerCallahan.com – Thought Field Therapy (TF): releasing unresolved emotions, stress and illness.

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